Don’t just rely on placeholders, include a label as well. As once a field has been filled out, the placeholder is no longer visible.
If you have two fields such as “Your name” and “Partner’s name” next to each other, it could be hard for users to be sure they filled out the correct field, without a label.

Don’t just rely on placeholders, include a label as well. As once a field has been filled out, the placeholder is no longer visible.

If you have two fields such as “Your name” and “Partner’s name” next to each other, it could be hard for users to be sure they filled out the correct field, without a label.

Rather than forcing the format of something like a phone number during user input. Use server side code to transform whatever the user entered into the format you want to display or store.
Not all users will want to input a number in the format you require, so why not reduce any potential friction.
Perhaps add in some validation in case what they have entered is way off though.

Rather than forcing the format of something like a phone number during user input. Use server side code to transform whatever the user entered into the format you want to display or store.

Not all users will want to input a number in the format you require, so why not reduce any potential friction.

Perhaps add in some validation in case what they have entered is way off though.

Forms with fewer fields seem less daunting to users, especially on mobile, where typing lots isn’t always ideal. 
Try asking only for a couple of fields to sign up, then ask for additional data later on when it is needed. For example, ask for a postal address when you need to ship or bill something, rather than at sign up.

Forms with fewer fields seem less daunting to users, especially on mobile, where typing lots isn’t always ideal. 

Try asking only for a couple of fields to sign up, then ask for additional data later on when it is needed. For example, ask for a postal address when you need to ship or bill something, rather than at sign up.